Volcanic Sensorium

curated by Nadja Argyropoulou

commissioned works for noūs

15.07.2022  (opening)

noūs santorini 

Santorini, Greece

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Froth on the Daydream (L’Écume des Jours)

Dimosthenis Avramidis, Christos Athanasiadis, Alexis Akrithakis, Chloe Akrithaki, Eugenia Apostolou, Kostis Velonis, Alexis Verucas, Martha Dimitropoulou, Athina Ioannou, Lizzie Calligas, Aikaterini Kanakakis, Apostolos Karakatsanis, Nicomachi Karakostanoglou, Pegy Kliafa, Harrie Kourkoulis, Vasiliki Lefkaditi, Marianna Lourba, Kleopatra Moursela, Liana Markaki, Irini Miga, Christos Bouronikos, Nikos Papadopoulos, Ilias Papailiakis, Alexios Papazacharias, Hara Piperidou, Lila Polenaki, Dimitris Rentoumis, Georgia Sagri, Evie Samara, Nana Sachini, Kostas Sahpazis, Giorgos Stamatakis, Magda Tammam, Tolis Tatolas, Philippos Tsitsopoulos, Kostas Tsolis, Efi Chaliori, Mantalina Psoma, Capten, Paolo Colombo

curated by Chloe Akrithaki

19.04 – 21.05.22

Gallery 7

Athens, Greece

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Daily Lazy

Irini Miga interviews Corinne Spencer about her practice and upcoming Solo Show at Hartnett Gallery at the University of Rochester (Rochester, NY).

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This work is based on the string games we used to play as children. These games have now been superseded by the dominance of computer games. The web weaves almost imperceptibly in the space. I created  this work at a time when the actual time seemed to have stopped (lockdown) by thinking of creative ways to use it, making the game itself speak to the passage of it and its seemingly stasis. I have multiple pairs of these handmade ceramic hands that can weave a web together along with the architecture of the building, bringing to mind webs of communication and solidarity.

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An enlarged abstraction of a Labyrinth marble maze sits on a corner in a precarious balance. Impossible to be played, this pastime activity game shuffles through the pages of Marcel Proust’s “In Search of Lost Time” Volume VII (Time Regained.) During the challenging period of lockdown, its glass marble ball is holding it up testing a game that is meant to teach patience and balance.

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An enlarged abstraction of a Labyrinth marble maze sits on a corner in a precarious balance. Impossible to be played, this pastime activity game shuffles through the pages of Marcel Proust’s “In Search of Lost Time” Volume VII (Time Regained.) During the challenging period of lockdown, its glass marble ball is holding it up testing a game that is meant to teach patience and balance.

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Going Viral

Ileana Arnaoutou, Sofia Dona, Maro Fasouli, Kyriaki Goni, Anestis Ioannou, Andreas Ragnar Kassapis, Panos Kompis, Latent Community (SNF ARTWORKS Fellows Jonian Bisai & Sotiris Tsigkanos), Maria Louizou, Collectif MASI (SNF ARTWORKS Fellow Madlen Anipsitaki & Simon Riedler), Irini Miga, Stefania Strouza, Maria Tsagkari, Ersi Varveri

Curated by Sotirios Bahtsetzis and Katja Ehrhardt

January 21 – March 3, 2022

In collaboration with: ARTWORKS, STEINZEIT Gallery Berlin, FREIRAUM in der Box Berlin
Donors: Stavros Niarchos Foundation (SNF), Schwarz Foundation, Griechische Kulturstiftung Zweigstelle Berlin, Hellenic Foundation for Culture
Under the Patronage of: Botschaft der hellenischen republik in deutschland

STEINZEIT Galerie Berlin

Kottbusser Str. 11, 

10999 Berlin

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My work is a small piece of paper, on the floor, with the word courage (κουράγιο) written on it. Courage is on the floor, waiting to be gifted to anyone who needs it. There, it is possible that it will be stepped on, by mistake (or not,) crumpled, and even worse thrown away as something worthless. Unfortunately, it will not be accessible to those unable to search for it. I have created a lot of courage — enough for the whole duration of this exhibition. If during the day —when the exhibition is open to the public— the courage remains intact, it continues to stay at the same spot for the next day.  If it is steeped on and crumpled it will be picked it up by the gallery stuff, at the end of the day, and placed in a box where all the courages that have been pressed out of shape will be collected. The next day begins with a new courage, in a different area of the exhibition space.This will continue until all the courage belongs to those who need it and those courages who have endured the pressure of the days are placed in a single frame. This will be the final work.

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by Irini Miga

 

Opening: Wednesday, March 4, 6:00-9:00 pm.

Duration: March 4 – 8, 2020

at:

Flyweight

25 Kent Ave

Brooklyn, NY 11249

(entrance at the corner of N12th St & Wythe Ave)

 

For Flyweight miniature project space Irini Miga presents An Interval, a scaled-down exhibition scene caught in an ambiguous process of making or unmaking. Composed of utilitarian objects such as a ladder, a nail, and a hammer, Miga imagines this intimate gallery in a moment of pause offering the viewer a space for contemplation. The otherwise empty room is filled with the sound of a love piece – “Requiem” –  a 1791 commissioned composition written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to commemorate a death, and a piece that remained unfinished due to the composer’s death.

An Interval will be on view in New York for a few days; a duration parallel to numerous art fairs bringing together countless local and international galleries showcasing artworks from around the world this period each year — even when there is an outbreak of a pandemic.

 

About Flyweight:

Flyweight is a 1:12 scale exhibition space for miniature solo projects organized by artists Clare Torina and Jesse Cesario. The mobile version of the gallery, presented here, moves around the city in collaboration with other galleries, curators, and collectors.

https://flyweight.nyc

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Within my studio, I gaze out of the window the sunrise at the industrial neighborhood at 7:37 am and take a snapshot. In the blink of an eye, 23 hours and 59 minutes pass, just one minute short of a full day, I am on the same spot looking out the window once again. Between these two flashes, how much has happened, how much has been left unsaid? I take one more picture of the ending moment of that day – the moment that connects that day to the next. What has left unspoken, hangs on a ceramic, handmade mechanism that elegantly lifts with a chain an industrial-like ceramic hook where an image that is rolled captures on its front and back those two moments.

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Cc

 

Antonakis, Alexandros Simopoulos, Dionisis Christofilogiannis, Nicomachi Karakostanoglou, Theodoros Giannakis, Petros Moris, Vassilis H. Jannis Varelas, Anna Lascari, Kostas Sahpazis, Panayiotis Loukas, Vassilis P. Karouk, Jack McConville, Quinn Latimer, Irini Miga, Eugenia Vereli, Charlotte Nieuwenhuys, Elena Demetria Chantzis, Panos Papadopoulos, Marilia Kolibiri, Nana Sachini, Margarita Bofiliou, Sofia Stevi, Kyvèli Zoi, Stefania Strouza, Ino Varvariti, Valinia Svoronou, Katerina Komianou, Alexandros Tzannis, Spiros Kokkonis, Giorgos Tserionis, Anestis Ioannou, Vaskos (Vassilis Noulas, Kostas Tzimoulis,) Nina Papaconstantinou, Nikolas Ventourakis, Natalia Papadopoulou, Amalia Vekri, Erica Scourti, Mary Zygouri, Nadia Kalara and 3137 (Chrysanthi Koumianaki, Kosmas Nikolaou, Paky Vlassopoulou,) Eleni Bagaki, Alexia Karavela, Karolina Krasouli

Curated by Olympia Tzortzi

09.12. 2021 – 30.12.2021

Callirrhoë 

Kallirrois 122, 

Athens, 117 41 Greece 

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Performative Transcending Somatic Dinner

 

Andreas Angelidakis, Eleni Bagaki, Savvas Christodoulides, Evi Kalogiropoulou, Katerina Komianou, Eva Papamargariti, Olga Miliaresi-Phoca, Maria Papadimitriou, Panos Papadopoulos, Vasilis Papageorgiou, Dionysis Kavallieratos, Irini Miga, Angelo Plessaas, Georgia Sagri, Socratis Socratous, Eva Stefani, Sofia Stevi, Valinia Svoronou, Thanasis Totsikas, Amalia Vekri, Evgenia Vereli

curated by: Lydia Antoniou and George Bekirakis

with the kind support of NEON Organization

03.11. 2021 – 12.12.2021

Korinis 4, Athens

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In a light-handed intervention, one encounters the impression of a single fingerprint sunken into the wall. Made from unglazed ceramic and seamlessly fitted into the wall’s surface, the remaining mark is barely perceptible from a distance of more than a few feet. It is the record of a motion–of pointing to, pointing at, pointing out–but the object of the pointing is noticeably absent. It is simply the gesture that persists in memorial of an understated action.

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The Art Newspaper Greece

Spring Works, Summer Shows

Review by Alexandra Koroxenindi

Re:

Spring Works, Summer Shows

with: Irini Miga, Kostas Sahpazis, Erica Scourti, Paky Vlassopoulou

June 17- September 15, 2021

Haus N Athen

Athens, Greece

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Daily Lazy: An Interview with Melanie McLain

 

Irini Miga Interviews Melanie McLain

Re:

Melanie McLain’s “Peripersonal” installation that was part of OTRXS MUNDXS (Curators: Humberto Moro and Andrés Valtierra with the assistance of Regina Elías) in Museo Tamayo in Mexico City, 

&

Her Solo Show, “Unchoreoraphic  Sculptures,” at La Cresta in collaboration with Colector in Monterrey, Mexico. 

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In Slit

 

Jacques Duboux, Konstantinos Kotsis, Chrysanthi Koumianaki, Anna Lascari, Andreas Lolis, Yorgos Maraziotis, Irini Miga, Fotini Palpana, Valia Papastamou, Georgia Sagri.

curated by: Hara Piperidou

01.07 – 04.07.2021

Back to Athens 8
International Arts Festival

Athens, Greece

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Spring Works, Summer Shows

 

Irini Miga, Kostas Sahpazis, Erica Scourti, Paky Vlassopoulou

 

17.06. – 31.07.2021

Haus N Athen
Athens, Greece

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Prizing Eccentric Talents

 

Andreas Angelidakis, Danai Anesiadou, Eleni Bagaki, Despina Charitonidi, Savvas Christodoulides, Manolis Daskalakis-Lemos, Theodoros Giannakis, Katerina Komianou, Irini Miga, Maria Papadimitriou, Rena Papaspyrou, Panos Profitis, Socratis Socratous, Amalia Vekri.

curated by: Georgo Bekirakis and Angelo Plessas

09.06.2021 – 31.07.2021

P. E. T. Projects
Athens, Greece

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Photo: © Chloe Akrithaki

Date: March 19, 2021

Irini Miga photographed by Chloe Akrithaki (#studiovisit) at Haus N Athen while being there as an artist in residence.

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Thinking about cosmology and human creation, I look at the work of William Blake “The Ancient of the Days.”  There, the word “Ancient” indicates that God existed before time began; literally, “before days were.” In Blake’s work, God is crouching in a circular form. His outstretched hand holds a golden compass over the darker void below creating the world. Having in mind the known certainty that I come from a woman; I create a compass-like shape with brass, which is the exact angle between my left pointer finger and thumb. I carve out of clay the distance between those two fingers – the length of which is 19.3 cm. – and embed it in a drywall piece nested in a notebook. This is my private footprint, a minute womb of creation that fills an otherwise empty notebook.

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Irini Miga: Artist-in-residence at Haus N Athen for the period Feb-March 2021.

For the first months of 2021 Haus N is launching a residency program for Athens based artists, in an effort to activate the space during these difficult months and form a dialogue between the local art community.

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Irini Miga: ARTWORKS Fellow 2020

 

ARTWORKS is a nonprofit organization that aims to create a fertile and nurturing environment for Greek artists through funding and public engagement opportunities.

ARTWORKS was founded in 2017 and is supported by its founding donor, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation.

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Click HERE for the Video Preview on YouTube

 

YouTube Preview:

Mr. Robinson Crusoe Stayed Home

O κύριος Ροβινσώνας Κρούσος έμεινε σπίτι

curated by: Polina Kosmadaki and Kostis Velonis

 25.02 – 09.05.2021

Benaki Museum
Athens, Greece

with:

Vanessa Anastasopoulou, Maria Antelman, Margarita Bofiliou, Martha Dimitropoulou, Anastasia Douka, Petros Efstathiadis, Zoi Gaitanidou, Maria Georgoula, Giorgos Gyparakis, Hope, Dionisis Kavallieratos, Ilias Koen, Zissis Kotionis, Virginia Mastrogiannaki, Irini Miga, Maro Michalakakos, Oryo, Malvina Panagiotidi, Aliki Panagiotopoulou, Maria Papadimitriou, Nina Papaconstantinou, Eva Papamargariti, Antonis Pittas, Alexandros Psychoulis, Yorgos Sapountzis, Nana Sachini, Kostas Sahpazis, Stefania Strouza, Alexandros Tzannis, Thanassis Totsikas, Nikos Tranos, Panos Tsagaris, Giorgos Tserionis, Jannis Varelas, Alexandros Vasmoulakis, Eugenia Vereli, Paky Vlassopoulou, Α Whale’s Architects, Theodoros Zafeiropoulos

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Daily Lazy

 

Irini Miga interviews Ionian Bisai and Sotiris Tsiganos (Latent Community) about their film Otranto.

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Daily Lazy

 

A conversation between Krista Clark and Irini Miga triggered by “Untenanted,” 

an exhibition by Krista Clark at Spencer Brownstone Gallery in New York.

 

Krista Clark: Untenanted

 

September 13 – November 17, 2019

Spencer Brownstone Gallery

170-A Suffolk Street

New York, NY 10002

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2:56

 

It is 2:56 am, and he still has trouble sleeping.

He turns the light on and picks up the book that lies by his nightstand.

He opens it to page 56.

He always believed that accidents are somehow destiny in disguise.

The question of the previous day still twirls in his head.

He stands up and walks towards the fridge.

He realizes that the distance from his bed to the fridge is 28 steps – that equals 56 steps from his bed to the fridge and back.

Coincidence?

He always worked too much. So much that he never had time to think of himself as a distinct entity.

Yesterday, the girl at the gas station asked him if he is free on Friday.

Free on Friday?

Today is Wednesday, which is two days away from Friday.

If he could be with the girl in bed that would make it one + one = two.

He looks again at the clock that sits on top of his nightstand.

The time is 2:56 am.

Still.

That is what he does when he has time.

 

– Irini Miga

 

Text as Press Release for the Show Leisure as a Mechanism for Resistance. 

Daily Lazy at Parallel Vienna, 2016

In my live-work space, I look at the straight-line indentations that divide the concrete floor in perfect rectangular shapes. Within those lines, I place scissors with engraved words on their blades.  The words included on them are taken from cartography books and survey manuals; the oldest of which is from the Land Ordinance of 1785 about the US rectangular system of surveys. Phrases like “chisel linearity,” “boundary establishment,” “land subdivision,” and “zenith angle,” appear on those blades. Institutionalized lines are dividing states, countries, and land in general. Cartographers use words and lines to break up physical spaces throughout the globe; these words are often the result of soldiers enforcing these boundaries. The installation space is filled with a sound that resembles the sound of scissors cutting coarse paper coming out from the desk. Up close, it is the sound of soldiers marching. As a promise for renewal, in front of the scissors, I mend the gaps with clay.

Location: Bemis Art Center for Contemporary Arts

 

Click HERE for the Installation video

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Mr. Robinson Crusoe Stayed Home

 

Vanessa Anastasopoulou, Maria Antelman, Margarita Bofiliou, Martha Dimitropoulou, Anastasia Douka, Petros Efstathiadis, Zoi Gaitanidou, Maria Georgoula, Giorgos Gyparakis, Hope, Dionisis Kavallieratos, Ilias Koen, Zissis Kotionis, Virginia Mastrogiannaki, Irini Miga, Maro Michalakakos, Oryo, Malvina Panagiotidi, Aliki Panagiotopoulou, Maria Papadimitriou, Nina Papaconstantinou, Eva Papamargariti, Antonis Pittas, Alexandros Psychoulis, Yorgos Sapountzis, Nana Sachini, Kostas Sahpazis, Stefania Strouza, Alexandros Tzannis, Thanassis Totsikas, Nikos Tranos, Panos Tsagaris, Giorgos Tserionis, Jannis Varelas, Alexandros Vasmoulakis, Eugenia Vereli, Paky Vlassopoulou, Α Whale’s Architects, Theodoros Zafeiropoulos

curated by: Polina Kosmadaki and Kostis Velonis

25.02 – 09.05.2021

Benaki Museum
Athens, Greece

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ESSEX FLOWERS
19 Monroe St New York, NY 10002
________________

Solo Show

Irini Miga

January 05 – February 03, 2019

________________

Away is Another Way of Saying Here presents recent ceramic and sound works by Irini Miga. Through subtle material interventions, Miga plays with the perceptual space between artwork and viewer, considering the threshold at which an object or gesture demands attention.

In Notes on Origin, Miga replicated marine debris found on the Miami shoreline in hand-sculpted clay and installed the pieces on the gallery wall in formation of the celestial constellation Orion. In a material disjuncture between plastic waste and hand-crafted earthenware, she cites the cautionary tale of the giant hunter in Greek mythology, who was slain by Gaia after claiming he would kill every animal on the planet. Miga draws a connection between the physical origin of the marine debris, Miami–a city predicted to be under water in less than 100 years due to climate change–to the mythological origins of Orion, whose arrogance towards other life forms ultimately caused his own demise. An adjacent sound work emanates from the closet within the gallery space, an area typically designated to store things out of sight. Referencing white noise machines that some use to meditate or fall asleep, the sound recording is also collected from the Miami shoreline. Ocean sounds are layered with human-made noises, suggesting that the ocean is no longer a refuge from human impact, as the waters fill with plastic waste.

Another series appears inconspicuously around the space of the gallery, taking form as an assortment of cleaning tools made of meticulously sculpted ceramics and brass. This series captures the often invisible and repetitive labor of cleaning, putting on display what might otherwise be tucked away in the storage closet. In a final light-handed intervention, one encounters the impression of a single fingerprint sunken into the wall. Made from unglazed ceramic and seamlessly fitted into the wall’s surface, the remaining mark is barely perceptible from a distance of more than a few feet. It is the record of a motion–of pointing to, pointing at, pointing out–but the object of the pointing is noticeably absent. It is simply the gesture that persists in memorial of an understated action.

Together these works propose a repository of gestures, memorializing what has been discarded or put out of sight. Through this collection of ignorables, Miga reminds us that the concept of ‘away’ does not exists, as what we cast aside remains with us. Her works capture the aesthetic conditions of that which often disappears in plain sight: tiny fragments of discarded material, a single fingerprint, cleaning tools, and the ambient sound from an urban shoreline. The aura
present in the labor and attention required to recreate these easily dismissible items weighs counter to the humbleness of each work’s first impression. In reverberation of an unstable time, Miga’s micro-interventions highlight the unfixed nature of appearances to those who pay close attention.

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Who’s Afraid of Komodo

 

Margarita Bofiliou, Anastasia Douka, Petros Efstathiadis, Zoi Gaitanidou, Phaidonas Gialis, Dimitris Gketsis, Hypercomf, Evi Kalogiropoulou, Theo Michael, Irini Miga, Ilias Papailiakis, Filippos Telesto, Thodoris Stamatogiannis, Valinia Svoronou,  Nikos Tranos, Eugenia Vereli, Eleni Zervou

curated by: Eugenia Vereli, Kostas Efstathiou

September 10 – October 17, 2020

Allouche Benias
Athens, Greece

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An Interval (Solo Show)

Flyweight, New York

04.03 – 08.03.2020

Flyweight
Brooklyn, New York, USA

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Overturned 

 

Stelios Karamanolis, Irini Miga, Tula Plumi, Jeanie Riddle, Yorgos Stamkopoulos, Yarisal & Kublitz

curated by Anaïs Castro

1.29 – 02.02.2020

Daily Lazy, Athens at artgenève
Geneva, Switzerland

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The Seen, Chicago’s International Journal of Contemporary & Modern Art, 

Profiling the Experience of a Residency: Spring Residents at Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts 

by Joel Kuennen

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In an attempt to address the problem of plastic debris in the oceans, I collected anthropogenic debris from the shore of Miami Beach — Miami is a city predicted to be under water in less than 100 years due to climate change. I hand-sculpted in clay all those elements that I collected; I fired and glazed them. I placed them on the wall in the formation of the celestial constellation Orion, aiming for the dialogue of three different environments.

Orion was a great giant hunter, in Greek mythology. His boast that he could rid the Earth of all the wild animals, however, angered the Earth goddess, Gaia, who expelled him and Zeus placed him among the stars as the constellation of Orion. Orion is visible from (almost) everywhere in the world and a reminder of arrogance. Recreating this constellation with marine debris but in ceramic (a natural material that has carried cultural stories from thousands of years) is an attempt to tell the story anew pointing to contemporary issues of hybris towards Earth.

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A found object, a book with the word “Horizon” on it, is either slowly being enveloped or emerging from the mountain of construction gravel. From our earliest ancestors up to the present, we are all linked by the daily view of a horizon. How would the natural horizons of the past compare to our present state?

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In the modesty of the Super 8 film and the simplicity of the gestures, chance and certainty are found in interchangeable positions, permanently incomplete and perpetually chasing each other. These two seemingly repetitive actions and the intervals between them, as myriad moments of invisible registrations, become a tableau for possibility

Super8 film digitally developed, 24F/s, 7mins in loop, 2017
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Solo Show

Irini Miga

Atlanta Contemporary

April 12 – June 3, 2018

 

 

Reflections is a site-responsive installation that utilizes sculpture, light, film, sound, as well as performed and embodied text.

As a term, reflection refers to both imagery and perceptions. Here, these themes also evoke the allegory of Plato’s cave, where people turn their backs on reality to see the world as its shadows, as illusions. Instead, this installation stages a cavernous space as a site for sensitizing viewers to the reality of their built environment and broad environmental dilemmas. Coal revolutionized our contemporary reality and human history. Nonetheless, more than any other energy source process activity, the mining, washing, transporting, burning, and disposing of coal, damages the environment. This fossil fuel tears up land, removes mountains, contaminates rivers and causes acid rain. It is one of the main sources of lung disease globally and the largest human contribution to the atmospheric greenhouse effect. The impact of coal far exceeds that of our individual electricity bills. Indeed, coal’s expenses are not only monetary because its uses take a toll on all of us—most especially those dependent on the coal industry and the least privileged and most vulnerable among us.

Unpacking the history of this exhibition site, Irini Miga invites us to contemplate the passage of time as we view the Chute Space. Her work adjusts our eyes to the idiosyncrasies of these surroundings as a former storage room for coal.

On the short Super8 film, Longevity Was Not a Priority in The Autonomous Region of Light, we encounter a still life with a burning candle in front of a poster depicting wild horses. Such props are evocative of Americana and the exhibition space’s past use as not only a coal chute, but also a place for fixing horse carriages. Connecting the depletion of our natural resources and the periled status of the coal mining industry, this work conjures vanitas, a genre of still life that centers on perishable goods and symbolizes human greed as well as the fleeting character of human life. Playing on notions of ephemerality, the grainy quality of the video casts a moment in the present as one that belongs to the past.

A suspended wall with ceramic inserts, Marks and Dents Were Always Part of This Picture, outlines select contours of the guts of a brick surface. Nodding to the visual language of coal’s various manifestations, the inserts contain anthracite dust. A hole in the backside of the wall makes visible a faint flickering light reminiscent of burning raw material.

Hanging from the pipe, a suspended lamp sheds light onto a bowl with hand-sculpted ceramic gloves and rocks. This beaming assemblage, Contracted by Light, recalls the arduous task of collecting coal in dark mines while gesturing to the accidents there that have cost countless human lives.

A mop stands alone as a domestic element. As a sculpture, You Talk the Language of The Soil, speaks to the labor of cleaning the space and the ever present danger of wiping away the past.

In a broken and unannounced way, a performance activates text during the opening. Spoken through the mouths of youth, the sounds of words will live momentarily and fade. The space and its visitors will absorb the audible text. Mixing past, present, and future, these sonic elements will act as seeds for further consideration.

Miga grew up in Greece, a country on the line between the perceived East and West, where the distant past, present, and desired future coexist; so for her, seeing things through a prism of constant symbiosis became a norm early on. As a female,  immigrant artist living and working in the United States, she finds humble, anti-monumental gestures and giving value to the minor and otherwise neglected of immense importance. In her practice she creates constellations of traces that ask for close examination. Marks of performative actions and traces of leftovers form a distinct understanding of what spatial identity or marking of time could be. Miga is interested in the way that we navigate and perceive our environments; in the language of objects that surround our everyday reality; in the dialogues and shifting relationships of axes such as time, physical space, form and utility; sculpture and painting. The implications of the Chute Space’s history compelled Miga to creatively acknowledge complicated environmental challenges of the past and present.

Installation View, Atlanta Contemporary, April 12 – June 3, 2018

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Solo Show

Irini Miga

Atlanta Contemporary

April 12 – June 3, 2018

 

Reflections is a site-responsive installation that utilizes sculpture, light, film, sound, as well as performed and embodied text.

As a term, reflection refers to both imagery and perceptions. Here, these themes also evoke the allegory of Plato’s cave, where people turn their backs on reality to see the world as its shadows, as illusions. Instead, this installation stages a cavernous space as a site for sensitizing viewers to the reality of their built environment and broad environmental dilemmas. Coal revolutionized our contemporary reality and human history. Nonetheless, more than any other energy source process activity, the mining, washing, transporting, burning, and disposing of coal, damages the environment. This fossil fuel tears up land, removes mountains, contaminates rivers and causes acid rain. It is one of the main sources of lung disease globally and the largest human contribution to the atmospheric greenhouse effect. The impact of coal far exceeds that of our individual electricity bills. Indeed, coal’s expenses are not only monetary because its uses take a toll on all of us—most especially those dependent on the coal industry and the least privileged and most vulnerable among us.

Unpacking the history of this exhibition site, Irini Miga invites us to contemplate the passage of time as we view the Chute Space. Her work adjusts our eyes to the idiosyncrasies of these surroundings as a former storage room for coal.

On the short Super8 film, Longevity Was Not a Priority in The Autonomous Region of Light, we encounter a still life with a burning candle in front of a poster depicting wild horses. Such props are evocative of Americana and the exhibition space’s past use as not only a coal chute, but also a place for fixing horse carriages. Connecting the depletion of our natural resources and the periled status of the coal mining industry, this work conjures vanitas, a genre of still life that centers on perishable goods and symbolizes human greed as well as the fleeting character of human life. Playing on notions of ephemerality, the grainy quality of the video casts a moment in the present as one that belongs to the past.

A suspended wall with ceramic inserts, Marks and Dents Were Always Part of This Picture, outlines select contours of the guts of a brick surface. Nodding to the visual language of coal’s various manifestations, the inserts contain anthracite dust. A hole in the backside of the wall makes visible a faint flickering light reminiscent of burning raw material.

Hanging from the pipe, a suspended lamp sheds light onto a bowl with hand-sculpted ceramic gloves and rocks. This beaming assemblage, Contracted by Light, recalls the arduous task of collecting coal in dark mines while gesturing to the accidents there that have cost countless human lives.

A mop stands alone as a domestic element. As a sculpture, You Talk the Language of The Soil, speaks to the labor of cleaning the space and the ever-present danger of wiping away the past.

In a broken and unannounced way, a performance activates text during the opening. Spoken through the mouths of youth, the sounds of words will live momentarily and fade. The space and its visitors will absorb the audible text. Mixing past, present, and future, these sonic elements will act as seeds for further consideration.

https://irinimiga.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/01-2.jpg

This is a film created for the show “Reflections” at Atlanta Contemporary’s Chute Space; a former storage room for coal.

On the short Super8 film, Longevity Was Not a Priority in The Autonomous Region of Light, we encounter a still life with a burning candle in front of a poster depicting wild horses. Such props are evocative of Americana and the exhibition space’s past use as not only a coal chute but also a place for fixing horse carriages. Connecting the depletion of our natural resources and the periled status of the coal mining industry, this work conjures vanitas, a genre of still life that centers on perishable goods and symbolizes human greed as well as the fleeting character of human life. Playing on notions of ephemerality, the grainy quality of the video casts a moment in the present as one that belongs to the past.

https://irinimiga.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/candle_small_website.jpg

Cosmology / Asthenia zine #07

 

Stano Filko, Irini Miga, Albert Mayr, Kathatina Hoeglinger, Chrysanne Stathacos, Lito Kattou, Alexios Papazacharias, Stephen Aldahl, Black Hole Generation, Kostis Velonis, Johana Pošová, Kostas Sachpazis, Hynek Alt, Thanasis Totsikas, Aleksandra Vajd, Jimena Mendoza, Antonín Jirát, Mariana Jiratová, Ricjard Nikl, Iris Touliatou, Jiri Procházka, Tomas Roubal, Amalia Vekri

organized and edited by Amalia Vekri, Antonín Jirát, Alexios Papazacharias

4.27 – 05.11.2019

Asthenia Zine 

City Surfer Office
Prague, Czech Republic

 

 

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Irini Miga: Spring 2019 Artist-in-residence at Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts

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Room for Failure

 

Carmen Argote, William Cordova, Eugenio Espinoza, Cristian Franco, ektor garcia, Dorian Gaudin, David Ireland, André Komatsu, Pooneh Maghazehe, Guadalupe Maravilla, Michail Michailov, Irini Miga, Gabriel Rico, Nahum Tevet, Martha Tuttle, Sergio Vega

curated by Omar López-Chahoud

2.21 – 05.19.2019

Piero Atchugarry Gallery
Miami, USA

 

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Turning the focus on the physicality of sculpture and its ability to enable deeper reexaminations of the environments we inhabit on a daily basis, an everyday mop, a humble tool of erasure, is frozen in use. It is allowing the viewer a chance to appreciate a moment, an object, and a labor that might otherwise go ignored.

https://irinimiga.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/1.jpg

Turning the focus on the physicality of sculpture and its ability to enable deeper reexaminations of the environments we inhabit on a daily basis, an everyday mop, a humble tool of erasure, is frozen in use. It is allowing the viewer a chance to appreciate a moment, an object, and a labor that might otherwise go ignored.

https://irinimiga.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/1-2.jpg

Away is Another Way of Saying Here (Solo Show)

Essex Flowers, New York

 

January 5 – February 3, 2019

Essex Flowers
New York, USA

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This is an assortment of cleaning tools made of meticulously sculpted clay and metal. This series captures the often invisible and repetitive labor of cleaning, putting on display what might otherwise be tucked away in the storage closet. These tools are a handmade replica of cleaning tools from the space that were exhibited. This set of tools is becoming a time capsule as it collects throughout the duration of the show everything that falls on the ground. From the dust of installing the works on the walls to visitors’ leftovers and everything in between this work is becoming a vessel of discarded time and space.

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When You Were Bloom

Keith Burns, Justin Cloud, Patrick Groth, Stephanie Hier, Irini Miga, Bridget Mullen, Douglas Rieger

July 20 – August 24, 2018

Thierry Goldberg Gallery
New York, USA

 

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ex-chamber memo (overseas) 5

When You Were Bloom, Thierry Goldberg Gallery, New York

Re:

When You Were Bloom,

with:

Keith Burns, Justin Cloud, Patrick Groth, Stephanie Hier, Irini Miga, Bridget Mullen, Douglas Rieger

July 20 – August 31, 2018

@Thierry Goldberg Gallery

New York

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Irini Miga: May 2018 Artist-in-residence at Fountainhead, Miami, FL

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Daily Lazy

Irini Miga at Atlanta Contemporary / Atlanta

Re:

Reflections (Solo Show)

curated by Daniel Fuller

April 12 – June 3, 2018

Atlanta Contemporary

Atlanta, USA

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