I believe in the importance of art as a universal language. In an era where hard-won rights are being eroded, where the fear of the “other” has prompted the advent of censorship, bans and hate speech, art depends on our ability to perceive things beyond boundaries. In that way, it becomes a device for thinking about our world in perpetual fluidity, where information can be read in different ways, raising new questions and allowing unexpected discoveries.

I grew up in Greece, a country on the line between the perceived East and West, where the distant past, present and desired future coexist; so seeing things through a prism of constant symbiosis became a norm early on. As an immigrant, female artist living and working in the United States, I find myself at times caught in the dichotomy that is created by opposing values. I find humble, anti-monumental gestures and giving value to the minor and otherwise neglected of immense importance.

In my practice, I create constellations of humble gestures that call for close examination. I ascribe value to the neglected, which becomes of great significance. Marks of performative actions and leftover traces become part of my spatial vocabulary, in which the marking of time is revealed. I believe in art that demands awareness of space and time, where the personal touches the common, where noise shifts recognizability and silent moments take off. By examining the way that we navigate and perceive our environments; today and in the past, my work engages with the memory of place from the point of origin to the present. This manifests as reconstructions of sites and objects of personal significance. I am particularly fascinated with the language of objects that surround our everyday reality; the dialogues and shifting relationships of axes such as time, physical space, form, and utility; sculpture and painting. I look at the point where sculpture touches painterly nuances as an unfolding sketchbook of our everyday reality in physical space. For me, the concept, the materials, along with the color that will activate the works and their surroundings are of equal importance. In that way, the work engages with its surroundings in a cohesive way, as a painting engages with its canvas or a drawing with its paper. 

I am always looking for the things that we discover after our eyes adjust to the subversion of expectations and constantly challenging the potential of my materials in order to create a variation of frequencies and movement within physical and mental space. I use basic sculptural materials like clay, wood, plaster, found and custom-made objects juxtaposed with everyday ephemera like paper, dust, and metal rods. I am particularly fascinated with clay as a natural malleable material that carries time in its essence and one that connects me with the history of my country. 

My references abound: they range from greek archeological excavation sites, construction sites, google photos, personal places, DIY YouTube videos, and literature, in particular, the magical realism of Mikhail Bulgakov, and Jorge Luis Borges.

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